<

Profile Of Veterans 2013 (Census Data)

20150802-survey-featured

The information on this page was presented in a July 2015 report prepared by the National Center for Veterans Analysis and Statistics.  The data used is from the 2013 American Community Survey (ACS) Public Use Microdata Sample. The universe for this analysis is the civilian population 17 years and older living in the United States and Puerto Rico. The data takes into account the reported data of 19,672,717 Veterans and 228,987,178 Non-Veterans

 

Summary of Veteran and Non-Veteran Comparisons

According to data from the 2013 American Community Survey, male Veterans were older, more likely to be White non-Hispanic, more likely to be married, less likely to be uninsured, less likely to live below poverty, and had higher personal incomes than male non-Veterans. Employed male Veterans were more likely to work in management and professional occupations, and more likely to work for local, state, or Federal governments than their non-Veteran counterparts. Male Veterans who worked year-round and full-time earned about $5,938 more than similar non-Veterans. Some differences between male Veterans and non-Veterans may be attributable to age. The median age of male Veterans in 2013 was 64 years while the median age of male non-Veterans was 41 years.

A lower percentage of female Veterans were in the youngest age group—17 to 24 years old than female non-Veterans. These are the ages when most men and women would still be serving in the military and would not yet have become Veterans. The median age of female Veterans was 50 and female non-Veterans was 46 in 2013. Female Veterans were more likely to be Nonwhite non-Hispanic, more likely to be divorced, less likely to be uninsured, less likely to live below poverty, and had higher personal incomes than female non-Veterans. Employed female Veterans were more likely to be in management and professional occupations, less likely to be in sales or service occupations, and more likely to work in local, state, or Federal government than female non-Veterans. Female Veterans who worked year-round and full-time earned about $6,321 more than similar non-Veterans.

1- Male Veterans on average are older than non-Veteran men. In 2013, the median age of male Veterans was 64 and the median age of male non-Veterans was 41.

20150802-p4

 

2- As with male Veterans, a lower percentage of female Veterans were in the youngest age group—17 to 24 years old than their non-Veteran counterparts. These are the ages when most men and women would still be serving in the military and would not yet have become Veterans. The median age of female Veterans was 50 and female non-Veterans was 46 in 2013.

20150802-p5

 

3- Male Veterans are more likely to be White not Hispanic than male non-Veterans. Female Veterans are more likely to be Nonwhite not Hispanic than non-Veteran women. Both male and female Veterans are less likely to be Hispanic than their non-Veteran counterparts.

20150802-p6

Note: “Nonwhite” includes Black, American Indian/Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander, some other race, and two or more races.

 

4- Male Veterans were more likely to be married and less likely to have never married compared with nonVeteran men. Female Veterans were more likely to be divorced than non-Veteran women.

20150802-p7

Note: There was no statistical significant difference between female Veterans and non-Veterans by married status.

 

5- A higher percentage of male Veterans were in management and professional occupations compared with male non-Veterans in 2013. These include occupations such as engineers, educators, doctors, and various types of managers. The percentage of male Veterans working for local, state, or Federal government was about twice that of male non-Veterans.

20150802-p8

Note:
(1) “All Other” includes Farming, fishing, and forestry; construction, extraction, maintenance, and repair.
(2) No significant difference between Veteran and male nonVeteran by self-employed.

 

6- The percentage of female Veterans working in management and professional occupations was about 7 percentage points higher than that of non-Veteran women in 2013. A lower percentage of female Veterans worked in service occupations, such as food service, janitorial, and child care, than female non-Veterans. About 35 percent of female Veterans worked for local, state, or Federal government, compared to 17 percent of female non-Veterans.

20150802-p9

Notes:
(1) “All Other” includes Farming, fishing, and forestry; Construction, extraction, maintenance, and repair.
(2) There was no statistical significant difference between female Veterans and non-Veterans by production and transportation.

 

7- Both male and female Veterans were more likely to have a combination of public and private health insurance coverage compared with their non-Veteran counterparts. The high percentage of male Veterans in this category was likely due to Medicare, use of VA health care and second career after retirement than non-Veterans. Male and female Veterans had lower uninsured rates than non-Veterans in 2013.

20150802-p10

 

8- In 2013, a lower percentage of both male and female Veterans lived below 100 percent of poverty compared with their non-Veteran counterparts

20150802-p11

Regardless of gender, there is no statistical difference in percentages between Veterans and non-Veterans in the 150- to 199 percent poverty level

 

9- In 2013, both male and female Veterans who worked year-round and full time had higher median earnings than their non-Veteran counterparts. Veterans of both sexes also had higher personal incomes than non-Veterans.

20150802-p12

“Earnings” refer to salary, wages, and self employment income. “Year-round full-time(YRFT) refers to employment of 50 or more weeks per year and 35 or more hours per week. Median earnings are calculated for the YRFT employed population with earnings greater than zero.

“Income” refers to the total of earnings and other sources of income such as pension, Supplement Security Income, public assistance, etc. Median Income is calculated for the total population with personal income greater than zero.

 

 

Summary of Veteran Comparisons

The largest living cohort of male Veterans served during the Vietnam Era (August 1964 to April 1975) while the largest living cohort of female Veterans served during Post 9/11 (September 2001 or later).

Compared with male Veterans, female Veterans were more likely to have completed some college, a Bachelor’s degree, or an advanced degree, be enrolled in college, more likely to have a service-connected disability rating, less likely to use VA health care at all but more likely to use only VA health care, and less likely to be insured, have no earnings or income, and live in poverty.

Employed female Veterans were more likely to work in management and professional occupations and sales and office occupations than employed male Veterans.

Some differences between male and female Veterans may be attributable to age as male Veterans are significantly older than female Veterans. The median age of male Veterans was 64 years in 2013, compared with 50 years for female Veterans.

The data below takes into account the reported data of 18,099,054 Male Veterans and 1,573,213 Female Veterans

10- The largest cohort of male Veterans served during the Vietnam Era while the largest cohort of female Veterans served during Gulf War II.

20150802-p14

Period of Service Dates: Post 9/11: Sept. 2001 to present; Pre 9/11: Aug. 1990 to Aug. 2001; Vietnam Era: Aug.1964 to April 1975; Korean War: July 1950 to Jan. 1955; World War II: Dec. 1941 to Dec, 1946; Peacetimes: Jan. 1947 to June 1950; Feb. 1955 to July 1964 and May 1975 to July 1990.

 

11- In 2013, a higher percentage of female Veterans had completed some college, a Bachelor’s degree or an advanced degree, compared with male Veterans. A higher percentage of female Veterans than male Veterans in all age groups were enrolled in college.

20150802-p15

“Educational Attainment” refers to the highest level of education an individual has completed.
“Advanced Degree” refers to Master’s, PhD, JD, MD, or other professional degree.
“Enrolled in College” includes enrollment in graduate years (freshman to senior) or enrollment in graduate or professional school (beyond a Bachelor’s degree).

 

12- A higher percentage of female Veterans than male Veterans had a service-connected disability rating in 2013. A higher percentage of male Veterans used VA health care but a higher percentage of female Veterans used VA health care only

20150802-p16

13- A higher percentage of female Veterans than male Veterans worked in management and professional and sales and office occupations in 2013. Nineteen percent of male Veterans worked in production and transportation occupations. These occupations include machinists, drivers, and aircraft pilots, jobs similar to what male Veterans may have done while in the military.

20150802-p17

Notes:
(1) “All other” includes farming, fishing, and forestry; construction, extraction, maintenance, and repair.
(2) There was no statistical significant difference between male and female Veterans by service.

 

Be the first to comment on "Profile Of Veterans 2013 (Census Data)"

Leave a Reply